fuck yeah, hard femme!

a celebration of fabulous femme folks who look just as tough as they do fly and a plethora of hard femme inspirations.

this is not a fashion/style blog; this is an identity blog with a large fashion/style component.

femme =/= female
please keep that in mind when reblogging - misgendering is rude as hell and easily avoided.
zuky:

infinitetext:

Zhang Yimou, Red Sorghum, 1987.

I watched 红高粱 Red Sorghum last night for like the 15th time since my parents took me to see its modest opening in a L.A. Chinatown theater in 1987. It was Zhang Yimou’s first film and still probably my favorite of all his dazzling works, based on the novel by this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Mo Yan. It was also Gong Li’s screen debut, in a mesmerizing, utterly convincing performance as a radiant strong-willed peasant girl who is sold into marriage with an old leper and winds up taking over his sorghum distillery, in the midst of the brutal, bloody Japanese invasion of China. The story bounces with ease between folkloric drama, comedy, adventure, and of course tragedy, as Chinese stories often do, in the manner of Beijing opera. Zhang Yimou went on to produce a slew of stylized big-budget masterpieces, but in my opinion it doesn’t get any better than his small-budget debut.

zuky:

infinitetext:

Zhang Yimou, Red Sorghum, 1987.

I watched 红高粱 Red Sorghum last night for like the 15th time since my parents took me to see its modest opening in a L.A. Chinatown theater in 1987. It was Zhang Yimou’s first film and still probably my favorite of all his dazzling works, based on the novel by this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Mo Yan. It was also Gong Li’s screen debut, in a mesmerizing, utterly convincing performance as a radiant strong-willed peasant girl who is sold into marriage with an old leper and winds up taking over his sorghum distillery, in the midst of the brutal, bloody Japanese invasion of China. The story bounces with ease between folkloric drama, comedy, adventure, and of course tragedy, as Chinese stories often do, in the manner of Beijing opera. Zhang Yimou went on to produce a slew of stylized big-budget masterpieces, but in my opinion it doesn’t get any better than his small-budget debut.

(Source: infinitetext, via stopwhitewashing)

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